It's Not the Camera, It's You

 

My argument is that a good photo doesn’t depend on the camera, it depends on the person looking through its viewfinder.

Sure, if you’re shooting with a Leica M3, the quality of the photo will be better than shooting with a disposable camera. But that doesn’t mean the subject/message/harmony within the photograph will be more interesting because it was shot with a Leica. You know what I mean?

When I first picked up a camera, I was shooting with an old Canon rebel that was given to me by a friend. It worked, but it did a horrible job with processing colors, and if you bumped the ISO above 400, the photo would get so noisy that you couldn’t use it. One realization kept me sane though; that people had created amazing photographs with the most basic equipment before any digital technology. Thank god for that realization! It stopped me from becoming obsessed with gear and thinking that I need to have the newest camera in order to shoot better photos.

Most of my photos from the beginning were in black and white because the camera couldn’t process color correctly.

Most of my photos from the beginning were in black and white because the camera couldn’t process color correctly.

Don’t get me wrong, knowing the basics of the camera (shutter speed, aperture, and ISO) is definitely important, but it’s only a fraction of the craft. The rest of it relies on how the person sees the world through the viewfinder. If the person doesn’t see light, interactions between people, architecture, pigeons, shadows, or even trash on the side walk in a curious/interesting way, how are the photos going to look? Dull, right?

I put together Photo Zero based on this belief: that how a person sees light and interprets the world is the key element in taking better photos. It is the main force behind the evolution of a photographer’s eye; pro or hobbyist.

It’s not the camera that creates the photographs, it’s you. Change the way you see, and your photos will follow suit